On the Guadalupe - Hunt, Texas

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Texas Coast Maps — Sea Kayak

 

 

Quick Facts:
The Texas coast is 373 linear miles - 2nd longest of all 50 States
There are 3,300 waterfront/shoreline miles
Bays & estuaries comprise 33,000 sq. miles
  Padre Island National Seashore is the longest undeveloped barrier island in the world — 66.5 miles of beachfront on the Gulf of Mexico
    and a similar distance on it's bayfront on the Laguna Madre.
   Padre Island National Seashore is the nesting ground of the Kemp's-Ridley Sea Turtle, the most endangered sea turtle in the world.

 

 

 

Kemp's-Ridley Sea Turtle — Sea turtles date back nearly 90 million years and are among the Earth's oldest surviving species. Yet the Kemp's Ridley sea turtle is quickly fading away.  Most recently, one of its last remaining habitat areas Texas' Padre Island National Seashore was opened for oil exploration and production, making the future of the Kemp's Ridley even more precarious.

Bush-Cheney have been prevented by Congress from drilling in the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR); but they have recently opened Padre Island National Seashore to oil exploration by the Corpus Christi, Tx. based BNP Petroleum Co.  Simply put, the drilling should never have happened.  Since it's founding as a National Seashore 1962, 8 Presidents have played by the rules and obeyed the mission given to The National Park Service:  No Development - No Oil & Gas Wells

The United States consumes twenty five percent of the world's petroleum but only hold's three percent of the world's reserves.  And with only one day's worth of natural gas under Padre Island National Seashore, we will never meet domestic demand or drill our way to energy independence.

Please join with us and other Texans to protest the new Bush-Cheney policy of allowing BNP Petroleum Co. to begin drilling operations and building roads thru the dunes for their 18wheeler convoy traffic on our Padre Island National Seashore.  BNP's plan to drill Padre Island National Seashore is a plan with no future.  It will carve new roads into the timeless wilds of Padre Island over the next thirty years and not contribute to America's energy needs, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, or help the local economy.
The total amout of natural gas which lies under Padre Island National Seashore is equivalent to that which is consumed by Americans in less than a single day.  70 percent of the profits will go to offshore investors in Japan, Australia, and Canada....whereas tourism to Padre contributes $39 million annually to the local economy.

It does not have to be this way, you can help by signing the online petition.

The Sierra Club along with other environmental organizations is asking that Congress step-in and fund the purchase of the oil & gas rights under Padre, then retire them permanently.  In this way, the original intent of the park will be fully realized.
Online Petition

Once They're Gone...They're Lost Forever
Wild animals need wild places....

If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them something more than the miracles of technology.  We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it.
—FORMER PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON, UPON THE SIGNING OF THE WILDERNESS ACT, 1964

 

 
  • Lower Laguna Madre Port Isabel:  out from Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge
    Numerous islands with large dunefilelds North - South of the Arroyo Colorado
 
         
  • Baffin Bay:  Bluest-Greenest & clearest water on the Texas Coast
   
         
   
         
   
         
     

(Covering Brownsville, Port Isabel, Mansfield, South Padre Island, Baffin Bay, Corpus Christi, Padre Island National Seashore, Aransas Pass, Matagorda Bay, Rockport, Seadrift, Port O'Connor, Palacios, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge)




Current Texas Coastal Water Temperatures by Location - NOAA


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